Cornell University

As part of the university's commitment to economic development and outreach, CTL hosts a variety of events to create connections between the Cornell campuses, industry members, entrepreneurs, and investors.

Entrepreneurship@Cornell Celebration 2008

On April 11, CCTEC hosted key Cornell researchers to highlight selected exciting Cornell technologies and new business opportunities from the Ithaca campus and from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City during the third annual Entreprenuership@Cornell Celebration event. Entrepreneurship@Cornell Celebration is a milestone annual entrepreneurship event that brings together over 500 students, alumni, faculty and staff. CCTEC held two emerging technologies showcases on the second day of the event.






CCTEC Emerging Technologies Showcase - New Technologies

With over $700 million (FY2007) in research expenditures and an excellent research faculty, Cornell is a rich source of technologies for entrepreneurs and industry partners looking for new opportunities. Cornell technologies contributed to many products across many industries and they come from varied research disciplines such as engineering, physical sciences, life and agriculture sciences and medicine.


Novel Biodegradable Biomaterials for Delivery of Biologics, Genes and as Templates for Tissue Engineering

  1. CC Chu
    Fiber Science & Apparel Design, Cornell University

    New biomaterial technologies have been designed, synthesized and characterized in Professor CC Chu's lab for a variety of biomedical uses. These new biodegradable biomaterials have been subsequently engineered into a wide variety of physical forms (e.g., 3D microporous gels, micro/nanospheres, electrospun nanofibrous membranes) so that they can be applied to a real world. The potential biomedical applications include the delivery of biologics, drugs, genes, cells as well as substrates for growing tissues.

E. Coli Glycosylation System for Recombinant Protein Production

  1. Matthew Delisa
    Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University

    Protein-based therapeutics currently represent one in every four new drugs approved by the FDA. However, the vast majority of therapeutic proteins require additional post-translational modifications to attain their full biological and therapeutic function. Since the majority of bacteria do not glycosylate (biological process of adding a sugar or sugar chain to a protein) their own proteins, expression of most therapeutically relevant glycoproteins, including antibodies, is relegated to mammalian cells. Expression in bacteria, on the other hand, does not suffer from production limitations as that in mammalian cell lines. Professor Delisa has developed a platform for performing complex human-like protein glycosylation in bacteria to generate functional and stable therapeutic proteins.

Innovative Lithography Technique for 10-20 nm Chip Features

  1. Amit Lal
    Electrical & Computer Engineering, Cornell University

    Professor Amit Lal has invented a novel lithography technique capable of patterning semiconductor chips with as small as features 10-20 nm. Instead of exposing resists with light projected through a mask, electrons emitted by a radioactive layer on a substrate pass through stencil mask to selectively expose the resist layer of a production wafer and transfer the stencil's pattern. This technology has the potential to transform the semiconductor manufacturing process by replacing photolithography equipment.

Novel GaN Technologies for Efficient Bulk Synthesis of Boules, Powder and Production of Thin Films

  1. Michael Spencer
    Electrical & Computer Engineering, Cornell University

    Cornell researchers in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed novel semiconductor technologies. The technologies include new Gallium Nitride (GaN) processing techniques and materials for wide bandgap LEDs, amplifiers, lasers, thin film electronics, and many other GaN-based devices.

Coferon Drug Design Platform

  1. Francis Barany
    Microbiology & Immunology, Weill Cornell Medical College

    Professor Francis Barany's research focuses on a new class of small molecule drugs called "coferons" and the fresh approach to drug discovery that coferons enable. Barany and his colleagues have designed novel methods to generate vast and diverse coferon chemical libraries, novel methods to screen these libraries against drug targets, and new methods to optimize the resulting hits. The coferon approach is built on deep insight into nucleic acid biotechnology, combinatorial and medicinal chemisty, and pharmacology.

Anti-infectives Drug Discovery Platform

  1. Lonny Levin
    Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College
    Jochen Buck
    Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College

    New biomaterial technologies have been designed, synthesized and characterized in Professor CC Chu's lab for a variety of biomedical uses. These new biodegradable biomaterials have been subsequently engineered into a wide variety of physical forms (e.g., 3D microporous gels, micro/nanospheres, electrospun nanofibrous membranes) so that they can be applied to a real world. The potential biomedical applications include the delivery of biologics, drugs, genes, cells as well as substrates for growing tissues.


CCTEC Emerging Technologies Showcase - New Business Enterprises

In keeping with Cornell's land grant mission to serve the community, CCTEC helps create new business enterprises based on Cornell innovations to promote economic development. More than forty new businesses have resulted from our recent efforts. Representatives from several of these new businesses were on hand to discuss their experience, challenges, needs and available opportunities.


Big Red Berry Production System

  1. Red Berry is a high-value fruit production venture based on the convergence of unique, proprietary berry varieties and cutting-edge production technology developed at Cornell. The business venture, envisioned as an agricultural franchise model, will leverage the expertise of the Cornell inventors coupled with strong brand strategy and marketing support. The value of the opportunity is driven by the significant and rapid rise in demand for local, fresh high-value berries and their nutraceutical extracts.

BZL Biologics, Inc.

  1. BZL Biologics, Inc. is drug development company focused on the development and commercialization of antibody-based therapeutics and diagnostics that target Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA). PSMA is specifically expressed by all prostate cancers and by the blood vessel cells of all solid tumors, but not by normal tissues. BZL's technology is well protected by many issued and pending patents worldwide. It's humanized "J591" antibody is the most advanced anti-PSMA antibody in clinical development, having completed 10 clinical trials involving 300 patients.

GeneWeave Biosciences

  1. GeneWeave™ Biosciences, LLC is a research and development company that has developed a technology platform that will revolutionize the $10 billion dollar (est.) bacterial detection industry. Our patented platform enables us to replace costly microbiology labs with small, low-cost diagnostics that detect bacteria and determine their drug resistance.


    www.geneweavebio.com

Novomer, Inc.

  1. Novomer, Inc., a new company founded on novel catalytic technologies, is developing "green" polymers, including plastics that are biodegradable and use carbon dioxide as their base ingredient, or feedstock.

    Most plastics are produced using petroleum products as the primary source of carbon. Producing plastic from petroleum harms the environment since petroleum comes from underground oil reserves that release large amounts of carbon dioxide into the air when processed. When plastics are disposed of, petroleum-based plastics do not biodegrade and produce more carbon dioxide, an environmentally harmful greenhouse gas that has been attributed as one of the key causes of global warming. Due to the fact that Novomer's plastic-making process actually consumes carbon dioxide, Novomer's "green" plastics may lend support to the recent trend for a "second plastics revolution."


    www.novomer.com

Terrenew

  1. Terrenew produces unique products derived from natural products and agricultural waste for remediation of heavy metal ions from contaminated water and absorption of oil spills.


    www.terrenew.com

Widetronix, Inc.

  1. Widetronix, Inc. has developed a new manufacturing process for silicon-carbide wafers using an in-house, proprietary epitaxial process. The wafers can be used to produce transistors and diodes used in applications such as hybrid cars, biological and chemical sensors, and high-voltage power systems.


    www.widetronix.com