Cornell University

As part of the university's commitment to economic development and outreach, CTL hosts a variety of events to create connections between the Cornell campuses, industry members, entrepreneurs, and investors.

Celebration 2012

CCTEC hosted a New Business & Emerging Technology Showcase on April 19th, 2012 from 12:30-2:30 pm in the Statler Ballroom. The showcase featured emerging technologies and new business opportunities from the Ithaca campus, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Researchers and business representatives were on hand to discuss the technologies and companies. The New Business & Emerging Technology Showcase is part of the annual Entrepreneurship@Cornell Celebration event. Celebration is a milestone annual two-day entrepreneurship conference that brings together more than 1,000 alumni, faculty, students, and staff.


To view photos from the showcase, click here.


For more information on Celebration, click here.



Agriculture & Plant Varieties


'Amber Delight' Butternut Squash

  1. Michael Mazourek
    Plant Breeding & Genetics

    This improved butternut squash variety lends itself to a beautiful display in planting with its rich, sweet, orange flesh and small size. For the grower, it offers powdery mildew resistance, high yield, and a quality product for market.

    View the poster here.

Biological Control of Crown Gall of Grape Vines

  1. Thomas Burr
    Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology
    Desen Zheng
    Plant Pathology

    Crown gall of grape vines is caused by the soil-borne bacterium, Agrobacterium vitis and has the ability to infect grape vines worldwide. A common and devastating grape disease, crown gall, has been known to result in losses of entire vineyards. A novel biological control system has been developed that protects the plants during field grafting to prevent crown gall. There are no other successful chemical or biological controls to date.

    View the poster here.

'Crimson Night' Raspberry

  1. Courtney Weber
    Horticultural Sciences

    'Crimson Night' produces firm, dark red, shiny raspberries with good flavor and size. The plant is moderately vigorous and produces a heavy primocane crop. It is best for the home grower.

    View the poster here.

Detecting and Quantifying Elemental Sulfur

  1. Misha Kwasniewski
    Food Science
    Gavin Sacks
    Food Science

    A portable, inexpensive, and simple device and method to detect and quantify elemental sulfur (S) at below part-per-million concentrations by converting sulfur to hydrogen sulfide has been created. Applications include use in agriculture, such as to detect and quantify sulfur on grape samples at wineries, and in environmental science, for example, to detect and quantify sulfur contamination in drywall.

'Double Gold' Raspberry

  1. Courtney Weber
    Horticultural Sciences

    'Double Gold' raspberries are a very attractive blushed pink to orange color. The raspberries have good flavor and size. They fruit in mid-autumn around September 15th. The plant produces a moderately heavy crop on very vigorous, tall canes. 'Double Gold' raspberries are best for the home grower.

    View the poster here.

Strawberry Purple Wonder™

  1. Courtney Weber
    Horticultural Sciences

    Purple Wonder™ strawberries are a deep burgundy color and are ripe in midsummer. Unlike red strawberries, Purple Wonder™ strawberries are dark throughout the flesh when sliced, and can be used for deep colored preserves and strawberry wine. This plant does not runner, so it is great for containers.

    View the poster here.

Biomedical/Bioengineering


Automated Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection System

  1. Gianpiero Palermo
    Reproductive Medicine

    In vitro procedures that allow creation of the human embryo outside the body were introduced in the 1970s. Early successes led to intense effort to improve the process. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was invented in 1992. ICSI is now carried out in at least 53 countries and has generated about two million babies. The affordability and access of ICSI have not been improved until now. The system is completely automated which would dramatically reduce costs of operation and maintenance and would provide a high standard of care worldwide.

    View the poster here.

Circulating Microvesicles: New Diagnostic & Treatment Targets for Cancer

  1. Marc Antonyak
    Molecular Medicine
    Richard Cerione
    Molecular Medicine

    Certain circulating microvesicles (MV) shed by cancer cells are able to transform normal cells into cancerous ones. These microvesicles are characterized by the presence of the protein cross-linking enzyme tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and fibronectin (FN) and represent a new and important area of oncogenesis that focuses on the unique contributing role of MVs in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    View the poster here.

Coferon, Inc.

  1. Coferon, Inc., a company based on technology from Weill Cornell Medical College, is developing a platform for making a new type of drug to reach targets that cannot be modulated by current drug technologies. Today's approved drugs are limited in their ability to reach drug targets inside the cell, in part, because of the size of the drug molecules. The vision of the Coferon platform is to develop orally active drugs that act like small drug molecules, can permeate cell membranes, and once inside, can assemble into larger molecules to behave more like biologics.

Diagnosis, Classification, and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

  1. Christopher Barbieri
    Urology
    Mark Rubin
    Pathology

    Prostate cancer is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous disease, and molecular classification holds the promise of improving risk stratification by defining distinct classes of prostate cancer association with specific genetic alterations. The discovery of recurrent mutations in the SPOP gene in human prostate cancer allow methods to use this information for the diagnosis, classification, and therapy of prostate cancer.

    View the poster here.

Differentiating Malignant from Benign Thyroid Lesions

  1. Olivier Elemento
    Physiology & Biophysics
    Thomas Fahey
    Surgery
    Xavier Keutgen
    Surgery
    Rasa Zarnegar
    Surgery

    This diagnostic test can accurately differentiate between benign and malignant pathology in indeterminate lesions of the thyroid gland on fine needle aspiration. Current assessment methods are not sufficient enough to determine the state of these "indeterminate" lesions. This invention involves a combination of expression of four MicroRNAs and analysis by a software program with specific developed parameters to calculate the likelihood of an indeterminate lesion being benign versus malignant. The test has been found to be highly accurate.

Increasing Functionality of Implantable Devices

  1. Jonathan Butcher
    Biomedical Engineering
    Chris Frendl
    Biomedical Engineering

    Risk of complications and patient rejection can occur when a medical device is implanted into the human body. This technology creates a micro-patterned physical niche on the exterior surface of a device to promote cell anchoring and proliferation. Biological acceptance of the device is therefore improved, leading to increased functionality of the implant and potentially better quality of life for the patient.

    View the poster here.

Lab-on-a-Syringe Device

  1. Ethel Cesarman
    Pathology
    David Erickson
    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
    Li Jiang
    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
    Matthew Mancuso
    Biomedical Engineering

    This easy to use device provides sample-in, read-out capability. A biopsy sample is inserted into a syringe and the syringe is filled with surfactants, solvents, and gold nanoparticles. These components lyse the cells, extract their contents, and provide a method of detecting viral DNA. A microfluidic chip is used in order to concentrate the gold nanoparticles and further enhance detection. The device can be built from cheaply available materials and reagents.

    View the poster here.

New Cancer Immunotherapy

  1. Xiaojing Ma
    Microbiology & Immunology

    In a progressive cancer, the immune system of the patient is weakened by cancer-invoked mechanisms that result in the patient's inability to resist the malignancy. A protein secreted into the blood by several cancer types that can strongly suppress the immune system, particularly the T lymphocytes which are the killers of cancers, has been identified. Therefore, blocking this secreted product in patients of certain cancers (including liver, lung, prostate, and B cell lymphomas) has the potential of reinvigorating the patients' own immune capacity to kill cancer cells with very little toxicity. Other applications for this technology include treatment of chronic infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis.

Point of Care Cyanide Detector

  1. Joseph Rella
    Medicine

    Cyanide poisoning is deadly and can result from exposure to fires. There is currently no means for testing cyanide exposure in most emergency departments. Doctors must rely instead on indirect markers of toxicity or treat empirically to provide timely therapy. The current tests return results two weeks after blood is drawn. A point of care cyanide detector can provide quantitative results in less than five minutes. The device incorporates existing scientific principles to provide timely information.

    View the poster here.

Predicting Relapse of Breast Cancer

  1. Maureen Lane
    Medicine
    Vivek Mittal
    Cardiothoracic Surgery
    Shahin Rafii
    Institute of Genetic Medicine
    Linda Vahdat
    Medicine

    By assessing the relationship between two bone marrow derived (BMD) cells, clinicians will be able to predict a relapse a few months before it occurs. After the prediction is made, a current intervention would be able to interrupt the process. Also, if these BMD cells are elevated before a patient has their definitive surgery for cancer, and if in those patients surgery promotes metastases, then an intervention can be put into place to prevent metastatic spread of tumor from an early point in the process.

    View the poster here.

Proven Vaccines Against Johne's Disease

  1. Yung-Fu Chang
    Population Medicine & Diagnostic Sciences

    This technology describes two patented vaccine compositions that have been proven to be effective in goats and cows against Johne's disease, a chronic and infectious disease that primarily affects ruminants (e.g., cattle, sheep, buffalo, and goats). In the USA, it is estimated that 68% of dairy herds contain at least one animal infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacteria that causes the disease, resulting in a loss of upwards of $250 million annually in the US dairy market alone.

Single Molecule Analysis Platform

  1. Scott Blanchard
    Physiology & Biophysics
    J. David Warren
    Biochemistry

    A use of new single-molecule Fluorescence and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) methods can provide powerful new means for directly detecting low concentrations of biomolecules, measuring binding-unbinding reactions and conformational processes within or between biological or synthetic polymer systems. Applications include detecting perturbations in biological polymers in response to inputs and small changes in environmental and/or solution conditions and revealing "molecular EKGs" of biopolymer systems that report on dynamic properties that are affected by small-molecules and regulatory factors with unprecedented sensitivity and information content.

    View the poster here.

Tissue Templates for Wound Healing

  1. Lawrence Bonassar
    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
    Jason Spector
    Surgery
    Abraham Stroock
    Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
    Ying Zheng
    Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

    Tissue templates for wound healing that include well-defined networks of micropores have been developed and characterized. While similar technologies have made use of micropores for cell invasion, this template is unique in that the invasion of tissue and vasculature is guided by continuous paths that pervade the scaffold. This allows for more rapid and more complete healing of the wound, due to not only development of skin tissue, but also of vascular structure.

Treatment for Retinal Disorders

  1. Marcelo Nociari
    Medicine
    Enrique Rodriguez-Boulan
    Ophthalmology

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative process that damages the macular region of the retina, causing a devastating decrease in the quality of life. A family of compounds, the cyclodextrins, has been shown to remove the age lipid A2E. An accumulation of A2E in the retinal pigment epithelium occurs with age and is believed to be a major cause of AMD and some related single gene diseases. Cyclodectrins have shown great potential for preventive treatment of these diseases.

Biotechnologies


A Genome Wide Translational Initiation Assay

  1. Sooncheol Lee
    Nutritional Sciences
    Botao Liu
    Nutritional Sciences
    Shu-Bing Qian
    Nutritional Sciences

    This technology describes a method to lock the initiation of translation so that the genome-wide translation initiation can be quantified. Errors in protein synthesis are linked to human diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. There remains a critical need for techniques that can quantitatively and directly monitor protein synthesis. Cornell inventors developed a global translation initiation sequencing method (GTI-Seq) that allows for precise mapping of the positions of 80S ribosome engaged only in translation initiation of mRNAs. The technology can systemically monitor protein translation and provides a means to assess erroneous translational events.

    View the poster here.

DNA Guided Assembly of Biological Pathways

  1. Matthew DeLisa
    Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

    This technology describes a method that uses DNA as the scaffold for spatial arrangement to assist in the assembly of enzyme complexes for biosynthetic production purposes. DNA has a highly predictable local structure, thus the scaffolds provide not only a higher local concentration of biosynthetic pathway enzymes, but also their arrangement in a predefined order. Potential commercial applications to optimize metabolic pathways for production purposes include industrial production, research uses, and protein folding, degradation, and modifications.

    View the poster here.

Physical Sciences


3D Software for GPS Alternative

  1. Daniel Huttenlocher
    Computer Science
    Noah Snavely
    Computer Science

    This technology allows for localization of a photograph anywhere in the world. Given an input image, the algorithm can give back an accurate estimate of where the image was taken and what direction it was looking. It does this by matching features in the image to a database of georegistered structure-from-motion 3D points and then estimating the 3D camera pose with respect to these points.

    View the poster here.

CatchAll Software for Fast Population Estimation

  1. John Bunge
    Social Statistics
    Linda Woodard
    Center for Advanced Computing

    CatchAll is a program which computes intensive estimates of total population diversity, based on count data from observation or experiment. Applications for this program include species diversity studies in biology and microbial ecology, and in capture-recapture analysis.

    View the poster here.

Device for Signaling Radiation Exposure

  1. Daehwan Cho
    Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
    Margaret Frey
    Fiber Science & Apparel Design
    Nikolas Hoepker
    Physics
    Chae Un Kim
    Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source
    Mark Tate
    Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics

    Conducting polymeric fibers are integrated into circuits and with exposure to gamma ray radiation, their conductivity will decrease. This device could provide real time, inexpensive signaling of radiation exposure at threshold levels relevant for warning of danger to humans.

High Performance Multi-Chip Optical Connection

  1. Yoon Ho Lee
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Michal Lipson
    Electrical & Computer Engineering

    To build the next generation supercomputers, it is essential to scale performance without exceeding extraordinary power consumption. This technology platform enables high speed integrated optical interconnects between multiple semiconductor dies, such as processors and memory dies. Planar processing of integrated optics between semiconductor devices is employed for the first time, which allows maximum flexibility and connectivity while taking direct advantage of all processing advancements in the semiconductor industry.

Honeycomb Web Tool

  1. Rick Anthony
    University Communications
    Christina Brasfield
    University Communications
    Tommy Bruce
    University Communications
    Jennifer Campbell
    University Communications
    Vitaliy Darovskikh
    University Communications
    Zac Doob
    University Communications
    Chris Kelly
    University Communications
    Kevin Laubacker
    University Communications
    Adam Palcich
    University Communications
    Ken Stuart
    University Communications

    This web-based tool aggregates links to Cornell content, including news, videos, stories, and events and then provides this database for users to search, categorize, and re-arrange into new collections. The new collections are then published to the web as pages or "cells" that can be further customized into print and email versions by end users. Communicators can construct customized presentations of existing materials for targeted audiences.

Low Power GPS Processor

  1. Filipp Akopyan
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Alyssa Apsel
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Sunil Bhave
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Stephen Longfield
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Rajit Manohar
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Carlos Otero
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Basit Sheikh
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Benjamin Tang
    Electrical & Computer Engineering
    Jonathan Tse
    Electrical & Computer Engineering

    Synchronous processor chips used in computers today utilize a clock to time the entire chip. However, this clock is also the cause of speed and power consumption challenges. Asynchronous chip architectures overcome these problems by eliminating the clock altogether. This portfolio of technologies presents various asynchronous VLSI chip technologies, including the first ultra-low power microprocessor for sensor networks, an event-based asynchronous chip-multiprocessor, an asynchronous Analog-to-Digital Converter, an Operand-Optimized Asynchronous Floating-Point Adder, energy-efficient pipeline and Zero-delay wakeup techniques for High-Performance Asynchronous Circuits, and a Low Power Asynchronous GPS Baseband Processor.

    View the poster here.

Optofluidics, Inc.

  1. Optofluidics, Inc., is developing microfluidic and biophotonic technologies for single molecule analysis and point of care medical diagnostics. Their initial products include the "Molecular NanoTweezer" which is a protein discovery tool that can handle the smallest forms of matter and the "Molecular Medic" which detects changes in blood-borne biomarkers to diagnose late phase hemorrhagic shock and traumatic brain injury.

    View the poster here.

Personalized Stringed Musical Instruments

  1. Pouria Pezeshkian
    Electrical & Computer Engineering

    Introducing a new generation of personalized instruments: guitars, banjos, cellos, violins, and mandolins all with the capability of saving user's sound configurations. Allowing for easy and quick sound change, the concept of a digitally controlled configuration switch is applied to the standard electric guitar. Different sound configurations are saved into presets, enabling the musician to instantly change pickup, tone, and volume during the performance with the selection of a button. Given the steady growth of the guitar industry, innovation of this kind has the potential to be a highly marketable and profitable venture.

    View the poster here.

Predicting Earthquakes Before They Occur

  1. Michael Kelley
    Electrical & Computer Engineering

    This technology can predict large earthquakes an hour before they happen, using GPS-based measurements of the total electron content between the satellites and the ground. It detects changes and avoids false alarms. With information of an earthquake coming, natural gas suppliers and pipelines could be shut down, people can be warned to leave buildings near the epicenter, and tornado-like warnings could be broadcasted.

    View the poster here.

Seraph Robotics, Inc.

  1. Seraph Robotics, Inc., is a personal robotics company born out of the Fab@Home project at Cornell University. The company's platform takes all the power of an industrial manufacturing plant and puts it into a tabletop device - the Seraph ONE™. Using simple software, ideas can go from concept to consumer in seconds. Anything from custom cakes, to toys, to consumer goods can be downloaded from the internet as easily as music and created in the home. The device has even been used to fabricate living human tissues. If you can imagine it, Seraph can create it.

Transforming Waste Heat into Energy

  1. Mahmut Aksit
    Materials Science & Engineering
    Richard Robinson
    Materials Science & Engineering

    This highly scalable technique for fabricating electrically conducting ceramic nanosheets can provide significant efficiency increases, paving the way for new devices that turn waste heat into useful energy. Tens of thousands of nanosheets can be synthesized at once making the cost of fabrication substantially lower than commercially available nano-structures. These nanosheets can be utilized to transform waste heat from sources such as automobile engine or power plant exhaust into useful electrical energy.

    View the poster here.

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